What You Need to Know About Hand Sanitizer

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What You Need to Know About Hand Sanitizer

THE NEED FOR HAND SANITIZER IS NOT GOING AWAY. SO REMEMBER TO GIVE YOUR HANDS LOVE AT THE END OF THE DAY!

I watched the news this morning as governments of states announced that there will begin a loosening of state restrictions. With the hunger to restart state economies vs. the coronavirus, at least 13 states will open parts of their economy. Public sanitation preparations are in process for these states; but you can do your part by keeping your hand sanitizer in each car, in your purses and pockets, and at each of your door entries. Anyone going out to public places should use their hand sanitizer after every encounter with a person or a surface.  One doorknob could potentially be the cause of the spread of Coronavirus in the workplace or home.

I, for one, have gotten comfortable with frequent hand washing because I have been at home so much. But there is a new challenge now: How do we reenter society without risking yours or your family’s safety? Where there isn’t a sink available, your hand sanitizer should be handy and ready to go!

Medical experts agree that one of the best ways to stay healthy is to wash your hands with soap and water. But when there is no access to a sink and soap, they strongly recommend hand sanitizers.

And there are differences between hand sanitizers, some not even meeting the CDC guidelines of at least 60% alcohol. Some of the hand sanitizers made by the brands Purell and Germ-X  use  “benzalkonium chloride” instead of alcohol as the active ingredient. The CDC states that such non-alcohol antiseptic products may not work as well for many types of germs, or may merely reduce the growth of germs rather than killing them. They may be better than nothing, experts say. But people are buying them without knowing the difference, even when alcohol-based sanitizers are available (but are often scarce). Customers seem to be confused. A customer on Amazon gave Purell’s alcohol-free, benzalkonium chloride-based hand wipes five stars, writing: “Honestly these wipes were a life saver. Due to the corona virus and me traveling to Vietnam, I bought a pack… I used these on flights, utensils before eating and seats before sitting. It gave me [a feeling] of safety.”  

DIY-ers: Don’t Waste Your Vodka! The shortage of hand sanitizers has led consumers to begin brewing their own elixirs of alcohol and aloe vera gel. Homemade Pinterest recipes are often no good, as people are using whiskey or vodka that doesn’t contain enough alcohol to be effective. The World Health Organization’s guidelines for making hand sanitizers require 96% ethyl alcohol.  Taking its consumer mission to heart, Tito’s Vodka tweeted a warning to its customers that its product didn’t contain enough alcohol to sanitize effectively: “Per the CDC, hand sanitizer needs to contain at least 60% alcohol. Tito’s Handmade Vodka is 40% alcohol.”

Our Natural Hand Sanitizer contains at least 97% alcohol (190 proof).

Another Caution: Triclosan, or TCS, is the active ingredient in many hand sanitizers. While this ingredient does effectively strip away a myriad of microbes, a 2018 study published in the journal “Environment International” found that it’s just as successful at spurring the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Just 30 days of exposure to 0.2mg/L TCS can cause multi-drug resistance to E. coli. Triclosan has made the news for its harmful effects on the body. The FDA recognizes this chemical as dangerous. Triclosan has been linked to serious health hazards, including reduced muscle strength, a compromised immune system, cancer, birth defects, heart failure, and an increased susceptibility to allergies. Triclosan is known to undergo photo-transformation in water to form dioxin, a cancer-causing substance. Dioxins are environmental pollutants that are included in a group of dangerous chemicals known as persistent organic pollutants. Once dioxins have entered the body, they endure a long time. Their half-life in the body is estimated to be seven to eleven years. In the environment, dioxins accumulate in the food chain. The higher in the animal food chain one goes, the higher the concentration of dioxins. Physicians and scientists worry that widespread use of antibacterial soaps might contribute to the spread of antibiotic-resistant superbugs that cause antibiotic-resistant diseases such as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE).  Increasingly detected in human blood plasma, urine and breast milk, triclosan is setting off alarms in the scientific community. A study at the University of Davis in California showed that the chemical hinders the heart’s capacity to circulate blood. Limb muscle strength was seriously compromised as well.  Dr. Nipavan Chiamvimonvat, the study’s co-author and professor of cardiovascular medicine, said in a press release, “The effects of triclosan on cardiac function are dramatic … Although triclosan is not regulated as a drug, this compound acts like a potent cardiac depressant in our models.”

None of our Creekside products contain Triclosan, including soaps and especially, Hand Sanitizer.

There are many occasions that it is recommended to use hand sanitizer, such as before and after touching a surface other people have touched. It’s also wise to use sanitizer after you’ve pushed a cart around the store, after filling your vehicle with fuel, after handling money, and after touching elevator buttons or door handles. Basically, you should use hand sanitizer after touching anything in the public, and when a sink and soap are not accessible. 

Again, Although most health officials say that soap and water is the best way to keep your hands virus-free; and when you’re not near a sink, the experts say, hand sanitizers are the next best thing. To get the maximum benefit from hand sanitizers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people use a hand sanitizer( that contains at least 60% alcohol). They recommend that we cover all surfaces of our hands with the product, and rub them together until fully dry.The (Importance of Hand Sanitizer in the Workplace During COVID-19: April 24, 2020)

A product review website owned by the New York Times, offers this hygiene related advice:

Do wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. This is the smartest thing you can do to prevent the spread of viruses.

Do make sure that if you buy a lesser-known brand of hand sanitizer, it’s made of at least 60% alcohol, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (C.D.C.)  That rules out the so-called “botanical” options made solely with anti-viral essential oils, and popular kid-friendly options.  

Do dry your hands before applying any hand sanitizer.

Don’t rely on DIY recipes based solely on essential oils. They won’t work.

Don’t be conservative with your sanitizer, even if you’re down to one small travel-size bottle. For it to work, you need to cover every surface of both hands entirely with the sanitizer and rub until dry, according to the C.D.C.

Don’t use any hand sanitizer on greasy or dirty hands.

Don’t assume all anti-bacterial products will do the job. Benzalkonium chloride, the active ingredient in Wet Ones, was found to be less effective than ethanol (as in alcohol, the active ingredient in some sanitizers), hydrogen peroxide, or sodium hypochlorite on coronaviruses in an analysis of 22 studies published in February 2020.

Don’t expect baby wipes to work as well as hand washing or hand sanitizer. Baby wipes don’t have alcohol in them, and  rubbing won’t remove germs from you hands.

(www.nytimes.com/2020/4/11)

“Alcohol sanitizers last only a minute or two and must be reapplied when recontamination occurs,” Philip Tierno Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at NYU Langone Medical Center told the New York Daily News. That’s right, two minutes. Even more alarming is that more than half of Americans believe the disinfectants last up to 30 times longer than that, according to a survey from Healthpoint, which sells a sanitizer it claims works for up to six hours. “Hand sanitizer is effective if you are going to shake someone’s hand or if you are out on the street with no sink, but it must be applied after every encounter,” said Dr. Len Horovitz, attending physician and internist at Lenox Hill Hospital. 

(www.insider.com)

Also… it turns out that the average person doesn’t know how long the sanitizer lasts—and according to some research, it isn’t too long. In fact, it’s downright shocking. “Alcohol sanitizers last only a minute or two and must be reapplied when recontamination occurs,” Philip Tierno Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at NYU Langone Medical Center told the New York Daily News. That’s right, two minutes. And more than half of Americans believe the disinfectants last up to 30 times longer than that, according to a survey from Healthpoint, which sells a sanitizer it claims works for up to six hours. “Hand sanitizer must be used if you are going to shake someone’s hand or if you are out on the street with no sink or paper towels,” said Dr. Len Horovitz, attending physician and internist at Lenox Hill Hospital. 

(www.readersdigest.com)

The Downside of Being Consciously Safe:

Washing your hands more frequently than you are used to can really dry them out and cause havoc on your skin! And using hand sanitizer as often as recommended can make your hands dry as well (even if the product does contain effective moisturizing ingredients). Rubbing high concentrations of alcohol on your skin is simply not pleasant!

So while you stock up on your Hand Sanitizer, please consider giving your hands some much needed care and treatment! 

Our popular organic Body Butter has a texture as smooth as butter (but not greasy), as healing as balm (but no medicine-like aroma), and offers many lovely scents (each made with pure components of the plant world). Our Body Butter is therapeutic and luxuriant for chapped or stressed skin, especially your hands at this stressful time!

Every jar promises at least 70%  pure, fresh shea butter, directly from west Africa (fair trade), along with other conditioning oils such as organic evening primrose oil, castor oil, grapeseed oil, flaxseed oil,

We add pure organic essential oils such as geranium, rosemary, lime, lemon, grapefruit, cedarwood, clary sage, vanilla sweet orange, sandalwood, lemongrass and patchouli to each unique body butter.

You can find our assortment of organic body butters to choose the one just for you and your family members at: 

https://www.thecreeksidecreations.com/body-butter/

Please stay safe and well, Creekside Friends! And stock up on Hand Sanitizer before your area or region prepares to open doors.

In the spirit of Health and Nature,

Caryn Summers, RN, founder of The Creekside Creations

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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.